Nine Years of Blogging, Six of Podcasting

9 years of blogging

Another year has gone by! After settling down in England, I found myself cooking more and dedicating more time to the podcast. With 17 posts, 10 of which are podcast episodes (four with new guests and six with returning guests), six recipes, and the first guest article, this has been a pretty productive year for me! After nine years, I’m as excited as ever for this project.

Why more cooking? I think it’s mainly because of two reasons. First, an increased availability of quality ingredients, especially produce, courtesy of the town’s street markets and of a couple of great supermarkets. Second, the access to a gas stove, as opposed to an electric range. I had forgotten what highly controllable, high-power heat can do for the home cook–get the water boiling in no time and then quickly bring it to a simmer; get the oil to a searing temperature, then lower the heat for braising and finally turn it all the way up for reducing. If you have tried both kinds of stovetops, I’m sure you agree. I hear induction is somewhere in between, but I have never tried it.

Why more podcasting? Well, because it’s a lot of fun! As I mentioned before, I love every aspect of the production, from approaching (or being approached by) a candidate guest to publishing the result. Partway through the year, I started tracking subscription numbers and I was pleasantly surprised to see that the podcasts had nearly doubled the blog’s subscriptions. I hope that this is an indication that podcasts are becoming more popular, which makes me happy since I have always felt part of a quiet minority of avid podcast listeners. I would like to thank my fabulous guests once more! I loved working with each and every one of you 🙂

This year, for the first time in this blog, I had the pleasure of hosting a guest article covering a topic I couldn’t have handled myself, but that perfectly fits within the project. Writer and enologist Melinda King kindly broke down the complex world of geographical indications and their cultural, political, and economic impact. To further discuss these themes, Melinda was also back as a podcast guest. Thanks, Melinda, for your generous contribution!

Looking ahead as year 10 starts, the podcast remains my main focus. I’ve already started working with future guests and can’t wait to have them on the show. I also plan on documenting a few more of the recipes I like to prepare, including my newest tradition–artisan bread from my sourdough starter, Bubbles! As you may have seen, Bubbles has now been in the family for four months, pretty much taking over my Instagram feed, in a rewarding and self-sustaining way 🙂

To close this brief retrospective, here is a summary of this year’s posts, grouped by themes, just in case you missed any of them. Thanks again for reading and listening, it has been an honor.

Recipes – First Courses

Asparagus Risotto with Parmesan Rind

Mushroom and Cheese Crespelle, the Italian Crepes

Recipes – Second Courses

Potato Crusted Sea Bream (Orata in Crosta di Patate)

Deep Fried Squid (Calamari Fritti)

Recipes – Sides

Braised Fennel

Deep-Fried Battered Cauliflower

Podcast Episodes

Guest Post

Geographical Indications: Italian Food, Made Official Or “Complicated Simplicity”

Paolo Rigiroli

Author: Paolo Rigiroli

Now based in the UK, Paolo is an Italian who lived in Canada for nearly 18 years and blogs about Italian food and its many aberrations.

5 thoughts on “Nine Years of Blogging, Six of Podcasting”

  1. How wonderful, Paolo! 9 years of blogging is a long time and so much work! Congratulations to you and continue to do the great work that you do! It is so necessary, especially in the US/Canada and the UK! 🙂

  2. It was quite a year, Paolo! Glad to have been a part of it in a small way at least. I’m mot surprised at all to hear that your podcast numbers are on the rise. It’s a fun and informative show and, as far as I’m aware, the only one out there focusing on the world of Italian food blogging. It’s a valued part of my regular morning (or evening) commute rotation—and as the numbers show, that of many others. Many happy returns!

    1. Thank you Frank! You’ve been a part of it in more than one way 🙂 Thanks so much for your support over the whole 9 years of this blog and especially for your constant feedback on the podcast – it has been a big source of motivation for me in a medium where the interaction with the audience is a bit more difficult.

  3. Gentile Paolo– Sei unico! The broad and beautiful amount of work you have given is magnificent. I am constantly impressed by the tremendous quality of your writing, and learn so much from the podcast, culturally and gastronomically. What started as a personal project of interest has become a work of art, and I look forward to many more years of investigation– which hopefully (soon) culminate in a writing/photography/recipe/personal reflection of THOUGHTS ON THE TABLE! You make things accessible, real, and fascinating, and your guests reflect care and sophistication. Thank you for opening minds, and stirring appetites. Sei grande!!

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